Wednesday, December 2, 2009

The Weirdness Continues...
















A couple of nights ago, I was interviewed on the Jeff Rense Program about my Contactees book and noted that the book contains a chapter on sightings of so-called "Space Brothers" in the vicinity of Stonehenge and Crop-Circles, and their relationship to the whole "Trickster" controversy.

Well, it so happens that I actually built my very own (albeit highly condensed in size, of course!) recreation of Stonehenge in our back-garden some time ago (yes, I know it's weird and I am too!); part of which is shown in the accompanying photo. So, imagine my surprise when I was out there this morning - cleaning fallen leaves off the fish-pond - when I saw sat atop one of the henge-stones a frog: and a dead and quite shrivelled one at that, too. How it got atop there, and why it did so to only sit and die, I have no idea at all.

But if this isn't some bizarre Trickster-like game of on-going and currently-unfathomable proportions, I'll eat my hat! And, as this link shows, the frog is a mysterious creature, indeed.

8 comments:

  1. I also have a mini (highly inaccurate) stonehenge that I built in my yard, probably about 10 years ago, using petrified wood. It is only about 14 inches high and maybe 2 feet wide. You aren't the only weird one. A couple years ago I found a dead bird in the middle of it. It didn't seem to be damaged, like if the cat had got it. It was like it just dropped dead there in the middle of my little henge.

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  2. Thanks for this Leslie - that's a fascinating story re the bird! There's definite weirdness afoot here...

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  3. Sorry - meant Lesley not Leslie!

    :)

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  4. the frog in the mythology of the pacific northwest: http://www.pathgallery.com/itoolkit.asp?pg=Frog

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  5. my pleasure.

    i have ordered your book and am eagerly awaiting its arrival. to me this is a very fascinating and very often overlooked or complete avoided aspect of the entire 'contact' phenomenon. i too think that something happened to these people, maybe not exactly what they claimed. adamski, for example, seems to have embellished things a lttle (or a lot) in his later books but even these embellishments bear consideration as something from the unconscious (at the very least). others such as angelucci seem fundamentally honest. it seems odd to me, and maybe points to something in human nature, that horrifying abduction scenarios are accepted as fact while the space brother type events are dismissed as fantasy. neither is any more likely or unlikely than the other.

    to paraphrase jung, something is seen, something happens, but we know not what that is.

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  6. For your amusement and mystification, a small section from the footnotes of Jason Louv's A Grammary in Ultraculture Journal One that bears directly on the sacrifice of frogs: "When I was twelve I was sent to camp for a week on Mount Palomar, as the San Diego public school system did to all sixthgraders at this time. At one point I found a small frog with its legs broken slowly dying in a cold stream. Feeling horrible for the frog, I put it in a plastic bag and showed it to a camp counselor. At this age I had an aquarium with two bull-frogs in it in my room who I regularly fed and cared for, I told the camp counselor that I wanted to bring the frog home and nurse it back to health. The counselor decided to take it upon himself to teach me a lesson about “the way things really are” and made me put it back in the stream to die, as is “the course of nature.” This began to compound my already growing hatred of authority figures. When I went home, already heartbroken, I found that in my absence one of my own pet frogs had gotten itself smashed in between a large rock and the edge of the aquarium and gutted itself (a pet snake had also died). Later, when I was seventeen, I bought a copy of Paranoia magazine
    with an article about Jack Parsons in it, which included the rather stunning factoid that Jack Parsons and the Agape Lodge of the O.T.O. had crucified a frog on Mount Palomar in the Forties (Crowley’s “Cross of the Frog” ritual)."

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  7. Hey Wildrote

    Many thanks for this - very interesting!

    Weirdly, I'm actually right in the middle of writing a chapter on Crowley for my next book...

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